Beyond 140 Characters: Recreating The Oslo Iced Coffee Method

Tim Varney recently tweeted:We were intrigued to say the least, so we contacted Tim Varney in Oslo and asked him to share his recipe for Cold Ndumberi. We’re delighted to reprint it here for you, exclusively on Sprudge.com. The method may seem a bit unorthodox to anyone with a simple, non-Scandinavian palate, so we’ve included a helpful pictorial along with each step, starring Scott Guglielmino (La Marzocco USA) and Ben Helfen (Counter Culture Coffee, Atlanta).

For starters, you’ll need:

70g of Tim Wendelboe Kenya Ndumberi “or similar lightly roasted Kenyan coffee”.

40g white sugar

1000g filtered water off boil

You will also need:

1.5 Litre Bodum french press pot (minus the plunger)

BUNN filter holder with 1 paper filter (really, any filter basket capable of holding 70g of coffee)

Scales, spoon, and timer.

Large bottle and plenty of ice.

(Editors note: Obviously you will be rinsing your filter, pre-heating your implements, calling your mother on her birthday, etc.)

First you take 70g of the Wendelbeans…

Then set your filter contraption on the press pot vessel, and tare the scale. For 40 seconds using 250g of water, you gently make a Wendelbloom…

Add the rest of the water, and allow ample time for your coffee to Wendelbrew.

Next, add 40g of white sugar directly into the brew. This might seem a bit Wendelstrange, but it makes life more Wendelsweet.

Go ahead and give the sugar a Wendelstir.

Now transfer to a fridge-safe bottle, and strike your manliest Wendelpose!

After 20 minutes in the fridge, give your coffee a nice ice bath, reducing the temp to around 60 degrees. Insert Wendelpun here.

Messrs. Michelman, Guglielmino and Helfen

Serve in an chilled glass – they use wine glasses in Oslo, but we had martini glasses on hand in Atlanta – and offer up a Wendelcheers to good coffee times.

Comments

  1. Keaton Violet says

    i’m trying this tomorrow with Heart’s Kenya Gichathaini. i think that counts
    as a Wendelstyle light roasted Kenya.

  2. says

    The primary reason we put sugar in the drink, is to bring out more of the fruit in the coffee – the sweetness in cold is normally muted, so adding sugar kind of revives the drink. It is a fine line; obviously over sweetening the drink ruins it.

    To get the best results, you’ll need to adjust the recipe to your own Wendeltaste.

  3. sL says

    I’d be interested to compare this to the ‘brew on to ice’ method.
    Is this an all around Wendelmethod for cold coffee, or more so specific to the coffee.
    Is it good without sugar?

    • Llewellyn Sinclair says

      sL,

      consider this to be an all-around Wendelmethod for cold coffee, but uniquely suited to bringing out acidity – sort of the opposite of an earthy, round-mouthed toddy. The acidity on Tim’s Ndumberi really shined, and that’s likely why they recommend “lightly roasted Kenyan coffee” for this method.

      We didn’t try it without sugar. We followed the Wendelmethod to the letter of the Wendelaw.

      • says

        I’d venture to say that the sugar balances the acidity nicely, but it does not “bring it out”
        just saying…but you can also do this with a shot of hot espresso
        wendelWHAT?!
        yes, you heard me.
        I used to tell the kids it’s like adding sugar to strawberries.

      • Llewellyn Sinclair says

        it’s like adding sugar when making sauce with late-season tomatos. when i was growing up, my mother used to say “lewellyn! you must add sugar to the sauce! it balances the acidity!”

  4. Paul Yates says

    I got to take a cup of that along with me on the drive back home, to keep me awake. I had to pace myself, as I thoroughly enjoyed it and wanted to savor it. Also, way to grab a rare picture of Ben Helfen in a HAT! Great time that evening!

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